What is Ranked Choice Voting?

What is Ranked Choice Voting?

Ranked Choice Voting in Vermont?  What exactly does that mean? A coalition of Democratic, Progressive, and Independent lawmakers from across Vermont have formally introduced H.444, legislation to make Vermont the second New England state to adopt Ranked Choice Voting for state and federal elections.


Check out the video from our friends in Maine and graphic below made by FairVote to learn more about Ranked Choice Voting and how it could be a positive change brought to Vermont!

The overall purpose of ranked choice voting is to require the winning candidate to receive a majority of votes. Under a ranked choice voting system, voters choose their candidates in order of preference, by marking candidates as their first, second, third, and subsequent choices.

If no candidate receives a majority of votes on the first round of counting, the votes are thereafter tabulated in rounds, with the lowest-ranked candidate eliminated in each round and the votes for that candidate transferred to the totals of each ballot’s highest-ranked continuing candidate (if applicable) until one candidate receives a majority of votes. The process is the same for multi-seat districts, with a majority vote election threshold based on the number of seats in the district.